Hunks in Heels: Walk A Mile in Her Shoes

Mar. 12, brought warm weather, melting snow and heels, red high heels.

Delta Upsilon, Alpha Chi Omega and the Health and Counseling Center put on the second annual “Walk A Mile in Her Shoes” event. This event brought together students, staff, faculty and community members to stand up against domestic violence and sexual assault.

Pat Skeate, ‘16, said, “I was so proud to see how so many people could come together for such an important cause.” Participants like Pat and so many others, registered and had all of their fundraising go to the Women and Children’s Horizons of Kenosha Center.

This center assistances women and children that have been and left destructive relationships and helps them get back on their feet by providing them with an array of support.

The night on campus began with participates and supports filling the field house. As they entered the upper level of the TARC they were faced with decorations, snacks and carnival games.

Volunteers from Carthage Activities Board, CAB, assisted in teaching the guys not only how to walk in heels, but how to have fun in heels.

Games with heel oriented themes covered in the inner layer of the track. The men walking in this event practiced without fear in order to get their footing with their new shoes.

Kelly Hearne, ‘17, said, “The part I was most looking forward to and enjoyed the most was watching all these guys walk better in heels than me.”

As the night progressed speakers like Mary Betsworth, Jason Ramirez, a Representative from Women and Children’s Horizons and Pastor Kara Baylor each shared what this event really meant to them and really got the supporters fired up for the beginning of the walk.

The walk started off with confident struts from its’ participants. These model walks mirrored those on all the runway across the globe. They struck poses as their strides met the beat of the music. Eight Laps with Dozens of guys limping as they took each turn. Each lap brought new excitement to the people that were there supporting this cause.

As the event continued to progress the pace of the walkers slowed and they began realize the full impact of the heels they were wearing. Abu Alfani, ‘17 said, “I never realized how much these things actually can hurt. Why would anyone ever wear these willingly?”

As Pastor Kara said, “This event isn’t just about red high heels, this event is about us as a community coming together to fight for those who deal with a surrounding of violence. Please love your neighbor and who’s your neighbor; everybody.”

Hunks in Heels: Walk A Mile in Her Shoes

Mar. 12, brought warm weather, melting snow and heels, red high heels.

Delta Upsilon, Alpha Chi Omega and the Health and Counseling Center put on the second annual “Walk A Mile in Her Shoes” event. This event brought together students, staff, faculty and community members to stand up against domestic violence and sexual assault.

Pat Skeate, ‘16, said, “I was so proud to see how so many people could come together for such an important cause.” Participants like Pat and so many others, registered and had all of their fundraising go to the Women and Children’s Horizons of Kenosha Center.

This center assistances women and children that have been and left destructive relationships and helps them get back on their feet by providing them with an array of support.

The night on campus began with participates and supports filling the field house. As they entered the upper level of the TARC they were faced with decorations, snacks and carnival games.

Volunteers from Carthage Activities Board, CAB, assisted in teaching the guys not only how to walk in heels, but how to have fun in heels.

Games with heel oriented themes covered in the inner layer of the track. The men walking in this event practiced without fear in order to get their footing with their new shoes.

Kelly Hearne, ‘17, said, “The part I was most looking forward to and enjoyed the most was watching all these guys walk better in heels than me.”

As the night progressed speakers like Mary Betsworth, Jason Ramirez, a Representative from Women and Children’s Horizons and Pastor Kara Baylor each shared what this event really meant to them and really got the supporters fired up for the beginning of the walk.

The walk started off with confident struts from its’ participants. These model walks mirrored those on all the runway across the globe. They struck poses as their strides met the beat of the music. Eight Laps with Dozens of guys limping as they took each turn. Each lap brought new excitement to the people that were there supporting this cause.

As the event continued to progress the pace of the walkers slowed and they began realize the full impact of the heels they were wearing. Abu Alfani, ‘17 said, “I never realized how much these things actually can hurt. Why would anyone ever wear these willingly?”

As Pastor Kara said, “This event isn’t just about red high heels, this event is about us as a community coming together to fight for those who deal with a surrounding of violence. Please love your neighbor and who’s your neighbor; everybody.”

Grad Gear Up Grousing

On Thursday, March 5, Carthage held Grad Gear Up in the Todd Wehr Center (TWC) for the soon-to-be graduating seniors. It involved ordering graduation tickets, confirming majors and minors, taking photos, filling out surveys and informational packets and tidying up any other last minute details. Some aspects of the event went well, while others drew multiple complaints, most notably the exceedingly long survey about activities and aspects of life at Carthage that delved into personal opinions that seemed to have no correlation to graduation.

This long survey was taken during the middle portion of Grad Gear Up, and it started off with the basics; our time at Carthage. Though some of the questions seemed to go a little off the beaten path, they were understandable, like, “Describe your study and homework habits,” or “Explain your interactions with your professors and classmates outside of the classroom,” and “What type of homework assignments have you been given in various classes?”

But after two pages of scantron questions, with questions seemingly a bit repetitive, the questions began to take a different tone. They started asking, “Detail your drinking, drug, and partying history while in college,” “Explain your religious beliefs, background, and opinion,” and even went as far as suggesting a person’s “opinion/ideas revolving around race and if race has affected people’s emotions/opinions/time during the last four years on campus.”

It is understood that Carthage needs basic information to present statistics about its student body to future incoming students, but after a while, the students’ murmurs in the room seemed to reflect the same thoughts including, “Why do they need to know that,” “This is getting a little too personal,” and “How am I supposed to answer that?”

This survey became a major frustration to most of the graduating student body and some students have voiced their opinions.

“I thought that the survey was ridiculously long and had nothing to do with what I learned during my time here at Carthage. I also didn’t like how it wasn’t clear that if you used a credit card, you wouldn’t get your $20 deposit back. Also I would like to know what the credit card money went towards,” Kelsey Rammelkamp, ’15, stated.

“I thought that it went smoothly. The lines were not too long, and I got through everything rather quickly. I thought that the survey was too long and unnecessary though. I don’t understand the point of having some of the questions,” Sam Ruch, ’15, said.

“Honestly, it could have been a lot worse, going much more into detail than it did. But at the same time there were certain questions where I thought to myself, ‘Is that really necessary?’ or ‘That sounds a lot like another question I answered twenty questions ago.’ However, I will consent and say that the survey is a necessary evil for Carthage to gauge the progress and experiences of its students. On the other hand, the seniors are already given a lengthy to-do list for Grad Gear Up, so to provide such a long list of questions–to be answered with a pen, by the way–might warrant a little revising,” Stephanie Anderson, ’15, stated.

 

In the coming years, this survey should be looked at and revalued. It could cause less annoyance and grumbling, if students truly knew what they had to complete. It was announced before hand that they would have to complete a survey, but not the extent or detail that was necessary. The survey even asked at one point how much money they owed at the time of graduation. Most people did not have that number memorized. Next time, things should be explicit, or in a better case scenario, shorter.

 

Grad Gear Up Grousing

On Thursday, March 5, Carthage held Grad Gear Up in the Todd Wehr Center (TWC) for the soon-to-be graduating seniors. It involved ordering graduation tickets, confirming majors and minors, taking photos, filling out surveys and informational packets and tidying up any other last minute details. Some aspects of the event went well, while others drew multiple complaints, most notably the exceedingly long survey about activities and aspects of life at Carthage that delved into personal opinions that seemed to have no correlation to graduation.

This long survey was taken during the middle portion of Grad Gear Up, and it started off with the basics; our time at Carthage. Though some of the questions seemed to go a little off the beaten path, they were understandable, like, “Describe your study and homework habits,” or “Explain your interactions with your professors and classmates outside of the classroom,” and “What type of homework assignments have you been given in various classes?”

But after two pages of scantron questions, with questions seemingly a bit repetitive, the questions began to take a different tone. They started asking, “Detail your drinking, drug, and partying history while in college,” “Explain your religious beliefs, background, and opinion,” and even went as far as suggesting a person’s “opinion/ideas revolving around race and if race has affected people’s emotions/opinions/time during the last four years on campus.”

It is understood that Carthage needs basic information to present statistics about its student body to future incoming students, but after a while, the students’ murmurs in the room seemed to reflect the same thoughts including, “Why do they need to know that,” “This is getting a little too personal,” and “How am I supposed to answer that?”

This survey became a major frustration to most of the graduating student body and some students have voiced their opinions.

“I thought that the survey was ridiculously long and had nothing to do with what I learned during my time here at Carthage. I also didn’t like how it wasn’t clear that if you used a credit card, you wouldn’t get your $20 deposit back. Also I would like to know what the credit card money went towards,” Kelsey Rammelkamp, ’15, stated.

“I thought that it went smoothly. The lines were not too long, and I got through everything rather quickly. I thought that the survey was too long and unnecessary though. I don’t understand the point of having some of the questions,” Sam Ruch, ’15, said.

“Honestly, it could have been a lot worse, going much more into detail than it did. But at the same time there were certain questions where I thought to myself, ‘Is that really necessary?’ or ‘That sounds a lot like another question I answered twenty questions ago.’ However, I will consent and say that the survey is a necessary evil for Carthage to gauge the progress and experiences of its students. On the other hand, the seniors are already given a lengthy to-do list for Grad Gear Up, so to provide such a long list of questions–to be answered with a pen, by the way–might warrant a little revising,” Stephanie Anderson, ’15, stated.

 

In the coming years, this survey should be looked at and revalued. It could cause less annoyance and grumbling, if students truly knew what they had to complete. It was announced before hand that they would have to complete a survey, but not the extent or detail that was necessary. The survey even asked at one point how much money they owed at the time of graduation. Most people did not have that number memorized. Next time, things should be explicit, or in a better case scenario, shorter.

 

Shooting in Madison sparks protests

Demonstrations are currently taking place in Wisconsin concerning the death of Anthony Robinson, a 19-year-old male who was shot by an undisclosed Madison police officer during an altercation last Saturday. Robinson was biracial, with an African American background. Controversy surrounding the shooting involves whether or not the officer’s actions were racially motivated, a common question Americans have been asking lately.

Chief Mike Koval of the Madison police department stated with the Wisconsin State Journal that police were contacted when Robinson was reported to be causing a disturbance in traffic. Officers arrived on the scene and followed the suspect into an apartment complex.

Robinson allegedly assaulted one of the officers. The officer, in turn, drew his weapon and fired five shots, hitting Robinson in the chest. Koval said that officers began administrating first aid immediately after. Robinson was taken to a local hospital where he passed away.

As required by state law, an outside investigation of the shooting is being conducted.

Protests arose shortly after the shooting had taken place and are continuing all across town. The University of Wisconsin-Madison campus has been the setting for numerous marches accompanied with drum beats and chants of ‘Black Lives Matter.” In addition, students from local area high schools, particularly those who knew Robinson, have walked from their respective schools to the Capitol building to show solidarity.

Demonstrators believe the shooting of Robinson was unjustified, and a nonlethal alternative should have been used. Savion Castro, a protestor and friend of Robinson Capitol building to show solidanal, “I ask the same question [Robinson’s] mother asked, ‘What happened to the taser?’”

Robinson’s family has been supportive of these demonstrations, though they do stress that they are non-violent. “Protest peacefully, please,” urged Robinson’s aunt, Lorien Carter, “but protest… don’t let it be in vain.”

Others are unsure of whether to categorize the shooting as racially motivated and are waiting to hear more from the investigation before making any judgments on the case. Many facts concerning the shooting remain unclear. Whether the officer’s motive for shooting Robinson was racially charged or simply an act of self-defense, is something that must be considered.

Robinson is remembered by family and friends as ‘gentle,’ ‘kindhearted’ and ’one of the happiest people.’ He had only recently graduated Sun Prairie High School and enjoyed playing basketball. Robinson’s family is currently raising funds for a funeral.

Shooting in Madison sparks protests

Demonstrations are currently taking place in Wisconsin concerning the death of Anthony Robinson, a 19-year-old male who was shot by an undisclosed Madison police officer during an altercation last Saturday. Robinson was biracial, with an African American background. Controversy surrounding the shooting involves whether or not the officer’s actions were racially motivated, a common question Americans have been asking lately.

Chief Mike Koval of the Madison police department stated with the Wisconsin State Journal that police were contacted when Robinson was reported to be causing a disturbance in traffic. Officers arrived on the scene and followed the suspect into an apartment complex.

Robinson allegedly assaulted one of the officers. The officer, in turn, drew his weapon and fired five shots, hitting Robinson in the chest. Koval said that officers began administrating first aid immediately after. Robinson was taken to a local hospital where he passed away.

As required by state law, an outside investigation of the shooting is being conducted.

Protests arose shortly after the shooting had taken place and are continuing all across town. The University of Wisconsin-Madison campus has been the setting for numerous marches accompanied with drum beats and chants of ‘Black Lives Matter.” In addition, students from local area high schools, particularly those who knew Robinson, have walked from their respective schools to the Capitol building to show solidarity.

Demonstrators believe the shooting of Robinson was unjustified, and a nonlethal alternative should have been used. Savion Castro, a protestor and friend of Robinson Capitol building to show solidanal, “I ask the same question [Robinson’s] mother asked, ‘What happened to the taser?’”

Robinson’s family has been supportive of these demonstrations, though they do stress that they are non-violent. “Protest peacefully, please,” urged Robinson’s aunt, Lorien Carter, “but protest… don’t let it be in vain.”

Others are unsure of whether to categorize the shooting as racially motivated and are waiting to hear more from the investigation before making any judgments on the case. Many facts concerning the shooting remain unclear. Whether the officer’s motive for shooting Robinson was racially charged or simply an act of self-defense, is something that must be considered.

Robinson is remembered by family and friends as ‘gentle,’ ‘kindhearted’ and ’one of the happiest people.’ He had only recently graduated Sun Prairie High School and enjoyed playing basketball. Robinson’s family is currently raising funds for a funeral.

Fitness Center Swims in a Cinematic Direction

March 11 marked the trial of a new type of event in the Tarble Athletic and Recreation Center (TARC): a Dive-in Movie. During the event, students had the opportunity to watch a movie and eat snacks during open swim hours. This year’s feature was ‘Finding Nemo.’ Along with the movie, pool noodles and water polo balls were available for students’ enjoyment.

The movie was shown on the big screen in the Koenitzer Aquatic Center in the TARC, which created a cinematic atmosphere while allowing students who did not want to watch the movie to use the other end of the center at their leisure.

The event was created through an idea by Tyler Prochnow, the TARC Supervisor and Health and Wellness Coordinator when he said “it would be a cool idea to do something fun with open swim.”

Though there was just a small turnout for the event, those that went gave positive feedback about the event, and all attendees enjoyed it. From this, potential to expand the event in coming years looks promising.

Kimberly Orton, ‘15, said, “It was a great time to get away and take a break from studying. I was able to go with my friend Shannon and relax in the pool and the hot-tub. The movie choice was great since it is one I am very familiar with so I didn’t feel like I had to watch it the whole time but could pass around a water-polo ball and eat some snacks.”

Her friend, Shannon Black, ‘15, stated, “The Dive-in took Nemo to a new level. If you’ve seen Nemo, you know that’s hard to do.”

Other students enjoyed the mixture of the two activities, the offering of snacks, and the overall atmosphere of the event.

When asked for ways to improve the event, students mainly thought that having more pool items or activities available and possibly a bigger variety of snacks. When college students are involved, it is a well known fact that more food is a sure-fire way to attract more attendees.

When asked about the Dive-in after the event, Prochnow said “I think it went well. For a first year event we will grow and be better next year. Next year I plan to either have them more often or have one big pool party.”

After this event, Prochnow is looking forward to the Every Kid Needs a Superhero 5K coming up in April.

 

Fitness Center Swims in a Cinematic Direction

March 11 marked the trial of a new type of event in the Tarble Athletic and Recreation Center (TARC): a Dive-in Movie. During the event, students had the opportunity to watch a movie and eat snacks during open swim hours. This year’s feature was ‘Finding Nemo.’ Along with the movie, pool noodles and water polo balls were available for students’ enjoyment.

The movie was shown on the big screen in the Koenitzer Aquatic Center in the TARC, which created a cinematic atmosphere while allowing students who did not want to watch the movie to use the other end of the center at their leisure.

The event was created through an idea by Tyler Prochnow, the TARC Supervisor and Health and Wellness Coordinator when he said “it would be a cool idea to do something fun with open swim.”

Though there was just a small turnout for the event, those that went gave positive feedback about the event, and all attendees enjoyed it. From this, potential to expand the event in coming years looks promising.

Kimberly Orton, ‘15, said, “It was a great time to get away and take a break from studying. I was able to go with my friend Shannon and relax in the pool and the hot-tub. The movie choice was great since it is one I am very familiar with so I didn’t feel like I had to watch it the whole time but could pass around a water-polo ball and eat some snacks.”

Her friend, Shannon Black, ‘15, stated, “The Dive-in took Nemo to a new level. If you’ve seen Nemo, you know that’s hard to do.”

Other students enjoyed the mixture of the two activities, the offering of snacks, and the overall atmosphere of the event.

When asked for ways to improve the event, students mainly thought that having more pool items or activities available and possibly a bigger variety of snacks. When college students are involved, it is a well known fact that more food is a sure-fire way to attract more attendees.

When asked about the Dive-in after the event, Prochnow said “I think it went well. For a first year event we will grow and be better next year. Next year I plan to either have them more often or have one big pool party.”

After this event, Prochnow is looking forward to the Every Kid Needs a Superhero 5K coming up in April.

 

Lost City Discovered in Honduras

An expedition to Honduras earlier this year has confirmed beliefs that the remains of a lost city exist within the jungles there, according to National Geographic.

Referred to as “The White City,” or “The City of the Monkey God,” it is believed to have been a part of an ancient culture and people that have been making attempts to find it since at least the early 1900s.

And although it is referred to as a singular city, archaeologists now believe that it is actually part of a larger chain of cities, an entire civilization.

National Geographic explains that the plans for the trip were set in motion after LIDAR revealed what seemed to be man-made structures under the jungle’s ground.

LIDAR stands for “light detection and ranging,” and, from an aerial position, it uses lasers to measure various distances to the Earth and then uses that data to help construct a 3-D image of the Earth’s surface.

Among the archaeologists’ discoveries are many different detailed and intricate sculptures and carvings, plazas and even a pyramid. Reports say that about 50 artifacts were slightly exposed, not fully buried in the ground, but that they believe many more are fully buried and waiting to be discovered.

National Geographic reports that according to Oscar Neil Cruz, member of the expedition team and leading archaeologist of the Honduran Institute of Anthropology and History, the artifacts date back to a pre-Columbian time, around 1000 to 1400 AD. The team studied the various artifacts they found, but did not remove anything.

While the specific location of this archaeological find is being kept secret for its protection from people who may attempt to steal the artifacts, the team reported some details.

They have said that the rainforest that they were exploring is one of the “most undisturbed” rainforests in all of Central America, but that it is threatened by the illegal deforestation that is occurring across the area.

The director of the Honduran Institute of Anthropology and History, Virgilio Paredes Trapero, predicted that unless something is done to prevent the rapid deforestation, the majority of the forest will be gone in eight years. National Geographic captured his dedication to saving the rainforest: “The Honduran government is committed to protecting this area, but doesn’t have the money,” he said. “We urgently need international support.”

Scientists are hoping to soon conduct another trip to the site in order to continue their explorations of the ancient civilization.

Incidentally, there was a Carthage study abroad program to Honduras this past J-term. However, the trip focused on biology and ecology rather than archaeology, and on the ocean rather than the rainforests.